After reading this please keep in mind that all treatment and outcome results are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, or nerve damage are some of the potential adverse risks of spinal surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results, and other important medical information.

The materials on this website are for general educational purposes only. Information you read on this website cannot replace the relationship that you have with your healthcare professional. We do not practice medicine or provide medical services or advice as a part of this website. You should always talk to your healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

Marie's Balloon Kyphoplasty Story

"I went in and [the neurosurgeon] said 'boy, are you a candidate for the kypho procedure.' And within two days I had it done."

The complication for KYPHON® Balloon Kyphoplasty has been demonstrated to be low. There are risks associated with the procedure, including serious complications, and though rare, some of which may be fatal. These include, but are not limited to heart attack, cardiac arrest (heart stops beating), stroke, and embolism (blood, fat or cement that migrates to the lungs, heart, or brain). Other complications include infection and leakage of bone cement into the muscle and tissue. Cement leakage into the blood vessels may result in damage to the blood vessels, lungs, heart, and/or brain. Cement leakage into the area surrounding the spinal cord may result in nerve injury that can, in rare instances, cause paralysis. A prescription is required. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, contraindications, benefits, and risks. Only you and your physician can determine whether this procedure is right for you.

Marie's Balloon Kyphoplasty Story

"I went in and [the neurosurgeon] said 'boy, are you a candidate for the kypho procedure.' And within two days I had it done."




Troy’s Decompression Story

"About seven years ago I was diagnosed with two slipped discs. I was working for a trucking company while I was in college, and I hurt my back. The slipped discs were at the L4-L5 level and the L5-S1 level. The L4-L5 was operated on while I was in college."

After reading this please keep in mind that all treatment and outcome results are specific to the individual patient. Results may vary. Complications, such as infection, blood loss, or nerve damage are some of the potential adverse risks of spinal surgery. Please consult your physician for a complete list of indications, warnings, precautions, adverse events, clinical results, and other important medical information.

The materials on this website are for general educational purposes only. Information you read on this website cannot replace the relationship that you have with your healthcare professional. We do not practice medicine or provide medical services or advice as a part of this website. You should always talk to your healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.

Troy’s Decompression Story

Troy

"About seven years ago I was diagnosed with two slipped discs. I was working for a trucking company while I was in college, and I hurt my back. The slipped discs were at the L4-L5 level and the L5-S1 level. The L4-L5 was operated on while I was in college.

"The other slipped disc level was not causing me any pain. But about five years later, I was playing golf and the minute I felt that back pain, I knew what it was. It was the same pain that I felt before. So, I called Dr. Maurice Smith at Semmes-Murphey Clinic and scheduled an appointment. He prescribed some pain medication, and we tried some conservative treatments, such as physical therapy. Then about three weeks later he took an MRI and said that he would need to operate.

"Dr. Smith scheduled a different surgery than the one I had earlier. This minimally invasive spine surgery would be done through a small incision with the METRx® System. I went to the hospital around noon, the surgery started around three, and I was back at home at eight o'clock, with reduced pain. I took the next day off from work. I was back in the office Monday and that following Friday left for a 10-week trip in Europe.

"With the microscopic procedure using the METRx System, I only had to have an epidural after the surgery. The major difference between the two is instead of making a large incision and cutting through the large back muscle, the surgeon makes a small incision and uses tubes, gradually adding one on top of the other until he is able to do the surgery. There is no cutting of the back muscle."

There are some risks associated with minimally invasive spine surgery, including transitioning to a conventional open procedure, neurological damage, damage to the surrounding soft tissue, and where used, instrument malfunction. Most of these complications can be treated once they are detected, but sometimes they require a longer period of hospitalization or recovery, additional medications, and sometimes even additional surgery.

It is important that you discuss the potential risks, complications, and benefits of the METRx® System with your doctor prior to receiving treatment, and that you rely on your physician's judgment. Only your doctor can determine whether you are a suitable candidate for this treatment.

Learn more about the METRx System and other Medtronic innovations

Find a specialist who uses this minimally invasive technology



Rob's Targeted Drug Delivery Story

Hear from others who have struggled along a pain journey and see how they found relief.

This story recounts the experience of a patient who is receiving Medtronic targeted drug delivery for the treatment of chronic pain. Medtronic invited him/her to share his/her story candidly. Please bear in mind that the experiences are specific to this particular person.

Rob's Targeted Drug Delivery Story

As a young married man in his mid-twenties, Rob was working as a pipefitter. He was helping to bring a heavy hot-water boiler into an older home when the steps gave way. In Rob's words, he "held on a little bit too long" and ruptured three discs in his back.

Rob developed chronic pain after his accident in 1981. It was devastating. His social life deteriorated and he found it difficult to work.

Over a 20-year period, Rob and his doctors tried injections, physical therapy, and a TENS unit. He also had multiple back surgeries and took prescription oral medications.

Discovering drug delivery therapy
Until Rob started receiving drug delivery therapy, the side effects from his oral pain medications negatively affected him and those around him. "The best way to describe it is they [oral pain medications] ‘muddy up the water’ as far as thinking and being myself. It changes your personality. I knew there was a difference. My employer saw a difference. My family saw a difference and that was...hard."

While Rob did not have any complications, there are risks associated with the procedure. The most frequently reported problems following drug infusion system implant surgery include infection, spinal fluid leak, pump inversion, skin erosion, drug side effects, loss of therapy effect, and therapy that did not meet the patient's expectations. For a complete list of adverse events that have been associated with the therapy, please refer to the Important Safety Information.

“It’s a great relief to be back and productive again”
Now, thanks to drug delivery therapy from Medtronic, Rob has rejoined his life in many ways.

"My family life has just gotten so much better. We've been able to do things we never thought we'd be able to do again," Rob says. "My work life has also changed dramatically. It's a great relief to be back and productive again."